Category: Feature

Former TV Anchor Monica Pearson Stays Busy in her ‘Rewirement’

Monica Pearson no longer graces metro Atlanta’s TV screens nightly, but she remains a significant presence on the local landscape. Pearson arrived in Atlanta after TV and newspaper reporting jobs in her native Louisville and became the first African American and the first woman to anchor a major Atlanta evening newscast, at WSB-TV in 1975. After a 37-year career, countless major stories and a veritable truckload of awards, she stepped away in 2012.

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Some Ghost Tours Return Despite Pandemic

Still, it’s hard to keep a good ghost story buried, and some metro guides and tour-hosting institutions are going ahead with their shows, which can offer a good way to learn a little local history. Some tours have moved online, while participants in other tours are being asked to don masks and socially distance themselves for in-person strolls through their haunted hometowns.

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What Will Change once COVID-19 Finally Is Controlled?

Professional futurists, government planners and senior service specialists are thinking about what life may look like for seniors, who have proved to be more susceptible to the disease, once effective treatments and/or a vaccine are developed for COVID-19.

The consensus is that connectivity, engagement and inclusiveness will all be crucial, and that, because of the pandemic, big changes are coming in where and how older adults live, ways in which they engage with technology, ways services are delivered to them, and how they will fit into the overall mosaics of their communities.

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Former Atlanta Mayor Helped Buckhead Stay ‘a Destination of Choice’

Sam Massell is a prime example of the term “pillar of the community.” The Atlanta native’s early real estate career drew him into a life of civic involvement: Atlanta City Council member, Atlanta mayor from 1970 to 1974 and later, founding president of the high-profile Buckhead Coalition civic and business group, a position from which he just retired after 32 years.

Now in his early 90s, Massell says he has every intention of staying active and adds that hard work has been a hallmark of his life.

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School’s In for Seniors as Local Enrichment Programs Go Online

Senior education programs, such as Emory University’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) program, are rapidly adjusting to that new normal. “We lost a lot of students in the beginning (of the pandemic). We dropped down to about 100 students from 1,000,” said Jeffery Alejandro, OLLI program manager. “We had a lot fewer courses because instructors were reluctant to teach online. But now they’ve been missing teaching and students have been missing taking courses and the socialization.”

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What’s Up Doc? A Local Shelter Just for Rabbits

GHRS was founded in 1996 when rabbits were rising in popularity as house pets and there were few animal facilities that would take abandoned rabbits, according to shelter Manager Jennifer McGee.

“Rabbits are the third companion animal behind dogs and cats,” McGee said. “They stay in the home, they’re litter box trained, they’re very neat and tidy, and you don’t have to walk them.”

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Making New Friends with Old Souls

Denise Fleck, president of the organization’s board of directors, said one benefit of choosing a senior animal was, “with older dogs, what you see is what you get!”

“They have already grown into their bodies and personalities, are often more low-key and just love to sit adoringly at your side,” said Fleck, of Villa Rica. “It is important to remember, however, that a 7-year-old senior dog can be quite different from a 13-year-old. So senior dogs, like senior people, have a range of needs and activity levels, but all still have so much love to give.”

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